Dalhousie wants student feedback on new diversity initiative

Dalhousie to engage students in effort to respond to ‘misogyny, sexism, racism, ethnocentrism, heterosexism, ableism, socio-economic disadvantage, colonialism, sexualized violence, harassment or discrimination’

"I think there should be more workshops, maybe smaller groups, so then students can actually engage. I don’t think setting up initiatives like the one in the email, I just don’t think that they’re going to be that effective, to be honest.” Hannah Forsyth, a fourth-year political science and economics student. Photo: Keili Bartlett
“What people may perceive as a lack of action, but where I see it as Dalhousie being cautious in what they do and how they take these steps in moving forward. I think it’s going as per Dalhousie policy, that’s the way I see it. Of course, people want to go and tar and feather people, but I don’t think that Dalhousie wants that to happen. I don’t think a lot of people want that to happen.” Chris Marshall, a first-year commerce student. Photo: Keili Bartlett
“I think it’s really good. I think it makes the world more peaceful, and we all come together and realize that we’re all the same.” Sarah Hamad, first-year engineering student. Photo: Keili Bartlett
“For South House to be involved in an initiative, hopefully there’ll be some change that’ll happen ... fingers crossed,” said Carmella Farahbakhsh, a South House administrator and volunteer co-ordinator. Photo: Keili Bartlett
“It’s really silly that we needed to start an initiative, it should’ve been something that’s been done for years. We live in Canada, it’s a multicultural country. I know there’s a predominance for white Anglo-saxon people, but if this is actually a real issue, it shouldn’t be up to the students, it should be up to the entire school and the province, even.” Michael Martino, second-year marine biology and sustainability student. Photo: Keili Bartlett

"I think there should be more workshops, maybe smaller groups, so then students can actually engage. I don’t think setting up initiatives like the one in the email, I just don’t think that they’re going to be that effective, to be honest.” Hannah Forsyth, a fourth-year political science and economics student. Photo: Keili Bartlett
“What people may perceive as a lack of action, but where I see it as Dalhousie being cautious in what they do and how they take these steps in moving forward. I think it’s going as per Dalhousie policy, that’s the way I see it. Of course, people want to go and tar and feather people, but I don’t think that Dalhousie wants that to happen. I don’t think a lot of people want that to happen.” Chris Marshall, a first-year commerce student. Photo: Keili Bartlett
“I think it’s really good. I think it makes the world more peaceful, and we all come together and realize that we’re all the same.” Sarah Hamad, first-year engineering student. Photo: Keili Bartlett
“For South House to be involved in an initiative, hopefully there’ll be some change that’ll happen ... fingers crossed,” said Carmella Farahbakhsh, a South House administrator and volunteer co-ordinator. Photo: Keili Bartlett
“It’s really silly that we needed to start an initiative, it should’ve been something that’s been done for years. We live in Canada, it’s a multicultural country. I know there’s a predominance for white Anglo-saxon people, but if this is actually a real issue, it shouldn’t be up to the students, it should be up to the entire school and the province, even.” Michael Martino, second-year marine biology and sustainability student. Photo: Keili Bartlett

Like every other Dalhousie University student, Hannah Forsyth, a fourth-year political science and economic student, received an email from the school Wednesday.

“I began to read the email, and then I lost interest, so I stopped,” Forsyth said with a laugh.

“It was similar to the other emails that we’ve gotten before where they’re saying they’re starting new initiatives and they have things in place, but I really don’t see anything tangible or anything that’s going to really change things at Dal. I guess it’s just more of the same, so that’s why I stopped reading it.”

Dalhousie University sent an email to all of its students, faculty and staff members at noon today to address a strategic initiative on diversity and inclusiveness at Dal.

Dalhousie Student Notice

The initiative, the email says, is a priority for the university, and will involve the senate, outreach groups like South House, campus societies and the Dalhousie community as a whole. The committee asks for people from the Dal community to share their thoughts.

“I think they should do something else,” Forsyth said.

Forsyth said she was disappointed by the forum on misogyny Dalhousie hosted last Thursday, because she felt most of the people who attended the forum had similar views. “We were all just kind of patting each other on the back.”

“I think there should be more workshops, maybe smaller groups, so then students can actually engage. I don’t think setting up initiatives like the one in the email, I just don’t think that they’re going to be that effective, to be honest.”

The committee hopes to help Dalhousie respond better to experiences of “misogyny, sexism, racism, ethnocentrism, heterosexism, ableism, socio-economic disadvantage, colonialism, sexualized violence, harassment or discrimination.”

When Chris Marshall, a first-year commerce student, opened the email from Dal, he thought “what Dalhousie was trying to do to cover what they were doing and to make sure people weren’t angry at them for doing what they’re doing,” he said.

“What people may perceive as a lack of action … I see it as Dalhousie being cautious in what they do and how they take these steps in moving forward. I think it’s going as per Dalhousie policy, that’s the way I see it.

“Of course, people want to go and tar and feather people, but I don’t think that Dalhousie wants that to happen. I don’t think a lot of people want that to happen.”

After gathering feedback and completing a review, the committee plans to release a plan to put the initiative in action in late February, according to the email.

 

 

 

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One thought on “Dalhousie wants student feedback on new diversity initiative

  1. “Dalhousie to engage students in effort to respond to ‘misogyny, sexism, racism, ethnocentrism, heterosexism, ableism, socio-economic disadvantage, colonialism, sexualized violence, harassment or discrimination’ – See more at: http://unews.ca/dalhousie-wants-student-feedback-on-new-diversity-initiative/#sthash.TaFJjWfV.dpuf

    Ah yes. All of this from 13 half-wits who were engaging in private misconduct.

    Clearly, no one had an agenda waiting in the wings in this case.

    This is a classic example of why people like the ones driving and engineering this platform do not hold real seats of power in society. Knee-jerk and blanket reaction to a series of events which are now being transformed past the point of being surreal will not solve anything, except to inflame the issue.

    13 young men chose to behave in an incorrigible manner privately, by way of posting derogatory and criminal THOUGHTS; not even intentions (hence the fact that they’ve not been charged under the criminal code). No one was sexually assaulted, nor did any of the suggestive thoughts transpire in reality.

    This being said, if we are to treat this in the manner that it is currently ballooning into a gigantic waste of time, resources and money to appease the feminist movement, perhaps we should have a look at some public postings of the feminist organizations.

    There have been instances where hard-core feminists have “jokingly” referred to the murder or mutilation of the male gender; crimes which are not taken lightly in the annals of justice. Perhaps it is time to take a closer look at the legitimacy of some of these groups, especially since some of these groups receive actual federal and provincial funding. With funding, comes accountability.

    These instances should not be taken lightly, yet they are posted publicly, not privately and as a sick joke, which was clearly the case with the 13 lug-heads who created this mess.

    I think this will be a very good opportunity to expose the agendas of both sides in a matter which has transformed from women participating on an equal level in society, into women using opportunity to advance themselves beyond men, at the expense of men.

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