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How Do I Eat Freely?

Today we’re going to talk about a topic I’ve never covered in almost 10 years of blogging: ALIMENTATION! If I’ve NEVER broached this topic in...

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UNews is produced by senior students at the University of King’s College School of Journalism in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. We publish it in six-week blocks in the fall and winter terms of the academic year as part of the course JOUR 4857/5857 Online Workshop. We launched UNews in October 2008.

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Our Latest Articles

Ghislaine Maxwell Poses ‘Extreme’ Flight Risk, says US Justice

The former aide to financier Jeffrey Epstein, Ghislaine Maxwell, poses an “extreme” flight risk if released, Manhattan’s federal prosecutor argued Monday ahead of a crucial hearing Tuesday.

Arrested in New Hampshire on July 2 after several months on the run, this jet-set figure was charged with involvement in a pedophile ring and inciting prostitution.

She is said to have recruited several teenage girls for Jeffrey Epstein in several cities around the world.

The financier hanged himself in his cell in early August 2019, a few weeks after his arrest.

On Friday, Ghislaine Maxwell’s lawyers proposed a financial package that guaranteed a $5 million bail to allow his release pending trial.

On Monday, Manhattan federal prosecutor Audrey Strauss asked federal judge Alison Nathan to dismiss the request, arguing that Ghislaine Maxwell posed an “extreme” flight risk.

The prosecution points out that the daughter of former British media mogul Robert Maxwell has substantial financial resources and a network of knowledge abroad.

She also enjoys French nationality, which would make her extradition impossible if she took refuge in France once released.

The prosecutor also recalls that Ghislaine Maxwell hid for several months after the Epstein case broke, knowing that the American authorities were interested in her testimony.

The prosecution also points out that the proposed arrangement for the surety is based on a guarantee and not on actual payment.

“The court should take this proposal into account for what it is worth: nothing,” prosecutor Strauss wrote.

The prosecution also dismisses the argument that Ghislaine Maxwell should be released given the risk of contamination at Covid-19 in the Federal Prison in Brooklyn where she is currently being held.

The prosecutor asserts that arrangements have been made by the prison to limit these risks.

Tuesday’s hearing, in the form of a teleconference, should be an opportunity to discuss the appropriateness of release and allow Ghislaine Maxwell to plead not guilty.

How Do I Eat Freely?

Today we’re going to talk about a topic I’ve never covered in almost 10 years of blogging: ALIMENTATION!

If I’ve NEVER broached this topic in 10 years of blogging, it’s because I felt too MARGINALE about it. And then I came across Elyane’s YouTube channel during confinement. Elyane is the only French woman certified in intuitive food!!!

It deciphers trends around diet, diets, and dickens more generally with gentleness and benevolence. I highly recommend his videos to learn more about intuitive power. Because thanks to her, I had a revelation (maybe I’m not so weird?) and a little relief (yesss I’m not the only one thinking/eating like that!).

Be careful, when I talk about “How I eat” here, it is my ALIMENTATION. I am hyper in tune with the way I eat and listen to my body, I do not seek in any way approval from anyone let alone give you any advice! I only share my experience because maybe you too are an intuitive eater without knowing it or that this philosophy may suit you 🙂

I am deeply convinced that I am today’s eater thanks to the education I had. As a child I was taught to accept her body, her differences, to eat everything, not to force herself, to have fun, to appreciate the benefits of sport, and above all to listen to her hunger and her body. For example, I never had the idea of dieting and I never chose a sport to change my physical appearance. I have never had a problem accepting my weight although I have had variations since adulthood between 48kg and 55kg pout 1m54.

So to answer briefly the question How I eat, I will say in one word: freely. I am greedy, I rarely finish a day without my square of chocolate or without a good dessert, I have a sweet tooth, I like pastries and fruit.

But I like all types of foods: vegetables, starches, legumes, grain products, dairy products, meat, fish… I don’t deprive myself of anything but I only eat when I’m hungry and what I need. I don’t enjoy eating something when I’m not hungry. I don’t like the feeling of being bloated or overeating so I listen!

Moreover, as my working days are very variable, I adapt enormously between the days at the office and those on the go, always listening and respecting my hunger.

Things you can do to have a more healthy lifestyle:

Have a more varied and balanced diet

Indeed, the time when we ate a food because it was rich in an X nutrient is over. There is no such thing as a miracle food. It is recommended to have a varied diet in order to ensure an adequate intake of all macronutrients (carbohydrates, fats, proteins) and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals). So you can eat a little bit of everything but in moderate amounts by making sure to eat a variety of healthy foods and limit salty, sweet and fatty foods. This reduces the risk of disease.

Listen to your hunger and satiety signals

This is an approach also known as intuitive feeding. He is advocated to listen to his hunger and satiety signals in order to properly regulate his food intake. A nutrition doctor I really like conveys this message.  She has established 10 principles that make it possible to have a better relationship with food. So, in my opinion, the intuitive feeding approach is to be tried in 2017, because, let’s face it, there is nothing flatter than following a strict diet.

Buy local food

This growing trend can also be known as “locavorism”. In short, it is a matter of feeding on foods that are produced locally. People adopt this lifestyle because it reduces the impact of their diet on the environment. Food does not travel a great distance (less than 160 km) between the producer and the consumer. Locavorism can also be adopted to promote the local economy.

Buy foods that look distorted

In the past, distributors were afraid not to sell fruit and vegetables that looked irregular. In order to counter food waste, deformed-looking fruits and vegetables will increasingly be purchased by consumers. In short, these are also very interesting economically speaking, because they are often sold cheaper.

Have more vegetable protein on our plate

In recent years, we have seen a decrease in meat consumption, whether for economic reasons or for health reasons. Many turn to poultry, fish and vegetable protein sources such as legumes and tofu. In 2016, it was the year of the legumes! This has allowed many of us to learn how to discover and prepare them. Also, more and more people are turning to vegetarianism and flexitarianism (a diet that aims to reduce meat consumption), so it is more common to find vegetable protein on our plate!

Clean Brands: My Favorites!

To follow up on my article a fashion more CLEAN, here is a selection of brands that I like very much. They are trying to produce better and are really interested in a more reasonable fashion industry.

Clothes

Orta Store

Number 1 in my heart: Orta! I like the models, the materials, the cuts, the commitments of the designer…

Made in France

Parisian and then

Comfortable pieces, trends, punchy colors, positive messages… everything I love.

Made in France

Rezine

Sarah Sooz Perez’s brand is eco-responsible. Models, fusion of trends and strong legacies of the designer. I invite you to follow Sarah and her brand Rezine to follow the creative steps of the collections.

Made in France

Louison’s petticoats

The big plus of this brand is for me the half custom. Skirts, dresses whose length is chosen according to its size!

Made in France

The French underpants

Super pajamas, underclothes, swimsuits…

Made in France

Balzac

I’m a fan of the brand’s bags but Balzac also offers clothes, accessories… timeless pieces and Spanish and Portuguese manufacture.

Made in Portugal and Spain

Shoes

Mr. Moustache

Sandals, ankle boots… I have favorites every season! The manufacturing is mainly Portuguese (I visited the factory) and Chinese for some parts. The brand has not found for its sneakers the know-how in Portugal.

Made in Portugal or China (all shown on product listings)

Anaki Paris

I really like this brand for the Anaki Studio part. A form, a pair of shoes created with the community, pre-sales, no waste. Follow on Instagram to closely follow the progress of the models.

Made in Portugal and Morocco

Lingerie

Rejeanne

I recommend 100% this brand of rules panties (my article on the subject) Made in France!

Accessories

Jules and jenn

Transparency. That’s what best sums up this brand. On each product sheet are detailed: material prices, manufacturing prices, transport prices and finally the selling price. Bravo!

Leather goods Made in France

Shoes Made in Italy, Spain and Portugal

tired or exhausted girl

Not Want to Play Sports: Lazy or Tired?

Right now, I’m doing a lot of sports. At least once a day, sometimes twice! I am notably the Pilates calendar offered for free on the BLOGILATES website. This American coach offers us every day a set of pilates exercises to perform at home. Every day of the week is dedicated to an area of the body: abdominals, arms and back, buttocks, legs etc. I enjoy checking the small boxes of the sessions done every day and sharing it on Instagram to motivate you.

The other day, I said in a story that I was too lazy to do my sport but that I had done my session anyway. I felt proud and energetic.

I received several comments telling me that I was not listening, and that I had to learn to rest. I thought it was very interesting! These messages inspired me to write this article!

Do you know the difference between laziness and fatigue? Do you know when your body needs rest or when, on the contrary, it needs a “kick to the buttocks”?

Fatigue is when you have insufficient rest time. You lack sleep or your sleep is of low quality. Your diet is not balanced. You work too hard. You don’t sleep well. You’re training too much. You are too busy with work or family, for all the tasks you have to do on a daily basis…

In short, the reasons for fatigue (the real one) are multiple and unique to everyone. And when you’re physically exhausted, you actually need to know how to press the STOP button.

If you feel exhausted as soon as you wake up, have headaches or muscle tension, feel physically “exhausted”: take a few days off. Sport is not your priority. Take some time to recover. You’re going to have to do it. Sleep!

Laziness is another story! Sometimes it’s just a lack of motivation: “I’m lazy to put on my sportswear” “I’m lazy to sweat” “I’m better off on the couch” “I’m more like watching a show than exercising”

And then sometimes we had a complicated day at work. We don’t have the morale. We are not in the energy of playing sports. You feel “at the end” morally. There, it is in the head that it is played.

Flemme and moral fatigue: in either case, sport is your solution!

Sport is When You Least Want it that You Need it the Most

After your session, you will feel in top shape, you will be proud of yourself. You’ll have more energy. You will feel energized and confident. Physical activity is great to put us back in a few minutes in a virtuous dynamic! Morale’s rising. Anxiety and sadness fly away.

For my part, I never expect to be motivated. Motivation is like the battery on your mobile phone: at the end of the day, there are no more!

So I never count on motivation. I’m still counting on DISCIPLINE. I don’t have any questions. I follow my own rules. If I have decided to follow a sports calendar, I do all the sessions in a disciplined manner.

That’s it… So it makes me smile when I get messages like “You should listen to yourself and rest.” I think people project themselves on me and reassure themselves by writing this.  It is obvious that the people who write this to me, do not engage in any physical activity, certainly feel guilty and reassure themselves as they can. I understand that. And I have no judgment about that.

If you still have trouble knowing if you’re tired or lazy doing your workout, ask yourself these questions:

Do you have enough energy to eat out with your best friend?  For shopping? To go for a swim in the sea? Yes? Then put on your sneakers!

Summer Tips During Sports and Heat Peak

Temperatures are soaring in the last week of June, with heat peaks of up to 35 degrees. A heat wave that questions many athletes: can we play sports in case of high heat? The answer is yes, but not under any conditions! I give you my 5 tips to move in the summer without taking any risks.

I am the first to take advantage of the summer to multiply the outdoor sessions. But when the mercury panics, a few precautions are necessary! I don’t want to put my health at risk, I’m adjusting my sports routine to train safely.

Warmth: Stay hydrated, the Golden Rule

No matter the season, proper hydration is essential to compensate for the mineral losses associated with perspiration. But this is all the more important in the summer when our body is forced to adapt to the hot weather.

I explain: the human being is homeothermic, that is, he needs to keep his body at a constant temperature to function well (around 37oC). When you’re playing sports in the middle of summer, the organization redoubles its efforts to regulate itself and sweats more than usual to cool off.

In fact, perspiration acts a bit like our internal fan. If we did not sweat, we would risk hyperthermia, that is, hot and fainting. Therefore, you should drink before, during and after the exercise to avoid dehydration and compensate for the water loss.

Don’t hesitate to spray your face with water (not to mention the nape of the neck) to create a feeling of freshness and bring down the temperature.

What do I drink?

I advise you to drink water from the first 10 minutes of training. Then every 5 minutes or so, without waiting to be thirsty and in small sips so as not to jostle your stomach. If you are splitting, drink at the beginning of the recovery phase, to give your body time to ingest it without choking.

Always leave with a small reserve: a bottle, a bottle… To avoid clutter, there are also bottle belts or backpacks with straw (the “camel bag”). But these solutions are intended for seasoned athletes, who go to train for more than 1 hour and who need to carry several liters of water.

If this is your case, a drink of effort can also be not bad. It will offset salt and sugar losses and help you maintain your rhythm. On the other hand, forget the sugary commercial drinks and opt instead for a homemade recipe that is super simple to make: 1/3 organic grape juice and 1/2 teaspoon of iodized salt in 1 litre of water. My lifelong favorite recipe!

Choosing the Right Time and Place

Going jogging at 2pm when the sun is at its zenith, is clearly not a good idea. In case of heat spikes, I recommend you adapt your sports routine and organize yourself differently. Take advantage of the cool hours and the sun that plays overtime to train early in the morning between 6am and 10am or in the evening from 7pm. To give you a marker, you should not train when it is more than 28oC.

For athletes who are very used to training, intense sport even in high heat will make cardio work more. So this increases the VO2 Max, and it’s pretty beneficial in the long run. But again: only if you are used to doing crazy split, intense effort, if you have the approval of your treating physician.

Personally I don’t. But I respect those who do and I’m not saying in my air-conditioned car “ha no but people, they do anything they’re going to kill themselves in sports in this heat”. No, if they are experienced athletes, they know what they are doing. Let’s stop judging all the time without knowing!

You can’t change your schedule and the outdoor sessions don’t tempt you? So focus on indoor sessions. I know, it’s frustrating to go locked up when the weather is nice, but there’s less chance of heat. In the gym (they have reopened, so we enjoy it!), at home, in a municipal swimming pool … Wherever you want as long as the temperature is pleasant and temperate.

On the other hand, watch out for the air conditioning that blows to block! Moving abruptly from very hot to very cold is not good either.

A Collection of our Stories

SMU prof’s ‘women speak first’ classroom rule an experiment

Judy Haiven says she hasn’t read the comments on her classroom practice

The Dalhousie dentistry scandal inspired the practice Judy Haiven has been using in her management classes at Saint Mary’s University since the first day of this semester: women speak first.

“I told (my students), because of the dentistry situation, I’m trying an experiment,” Haiven said on Monday.

Haiven said she uses the practice in reaction to the Dal dentistry scandal because she saw that women weren’t playing an active role, but were being used like “props” by the Facebook group. Her experiment, she hopes, will make “classroom time more beneficial.”

Dr. Judy Haiven, a management professor at Saint Mary's University, has started an experiment where women speak first in the classroom. Photo: Keili Bartlett

“The dentistry scandal made me more aware of how women often don’t have as loud a voice as men, and the fact that with the dentistry scandal that men put out demeaning information and made terrible suggestions on the Facebook group, made me realize that we need to hear more from women, especially women in university,” she said in an interview Monday.

“Because I could see in a way how powerless they seem to be in the question of the Dal dental students.”

Within her own classroom, something she’s noticed “quite often” in more than a decade of teaching, is “there is some bullying that goes on, there are tendencies (towards) competition and to one-up (each other), which tends to discourage women from participating. So if women speak first, it sets a different tone. Even in the last few weeks.”

She has tried her experiment in both of the courses she teaches. She calls on women first during a discussion or question period, and will ask the class if a woman would like to speak first, if only male students have their hands raised.

The experiment also extends to group projects.

Haiven said that group projects typically divided the work between men and women by having the women type up the projects and the men present it.

“So I’m trying to reverse that,” Haiven said. “I’ve told them that I’d like to see more women presenting and I’ve also in one instance asked the men if they can be the scribes, that they take notes, and the women take the notes and present.”

During Dalhousie’s forum on misogyny on Jan. 15, more than 350 people attended the discussion of two panels. In the first panel, Haiven told the attendees about her classroom experiment. The story UNews posted about the forum has sparked a debate in the comments section, and on social media.

Some commenters claim Haiven’s practice is an example of “misandry,” or the hatred of men. Others blame the practice for feminism’s bad reputation.

Screen Shot 2015-01-19 at 8.21.28 PM

Haiven printed some of the comments from the article off, but hasn’t read them.

“I try not to read the comments from the commentariat because I find they’re generally offensive, and not particularly helpful, I would say. So I haven’t heard anything bad back yet,” Haiven said on Monday. “I did read a couple of comments, but I didn’t read them all.”

Screen Shot 2015-01-19 at 8.24.20 PM

he hasn’t gotten any negative feedback from students in her classes, but when she first introduced the practice, many seemed nervous. The women may have felt “put on the spot,” she said.

A faculty member from another department at SMU told Haiven there were negative responses on Facebook to her idea. Haiven said she thinks the negative responses are because it’s a new idea.

Haiven says she hasn’t figured out how her experiment applies to people who identify as trans, or who don’t identify with a particular gender. She also hasn’t determined how race should play into it.

The rest of her department has not followed suit, nor has any other department at SMU that she knows of, Haiven said.

Dal students build 3D model archive

Laser scanning opens up access to university treasures

Michael Groenendyk gingerly places a delicate specimen on the scanning platform.

“When you’re touching it, you should feel nervous,” he says. Some of these objects can’t be replaced.

Over the last year, Groenendyk has joined the short list of people to have handled some of Halifax’s most cherished pieces of history and science: archeological treasures, rare biological specimens, relics from the Halifax explosion and the Titanic. Through his work, he hopes many more people will be able to get as close to these items as he has.

Michael Groenendyk prepares a red abalone shell for 3D scanning

On behalf of the Dalhousie University Library, Groenendyk and his team are building a 3D model repository: an open database filled with three-dimensional scans of interesting objects in the university’s possession. The files can be freely downloaded in their full detail and viewed in most common 3D modelling applications.

Groenendyk is one of the grad students in Dalhousie’s library and information studies program responsible for the Makerbot Replicator installation at the Killam Library, a project that offers cheap 3D printing to students and faculty. While it’s been less visible than the 3D printer, the library’s repository project has wider implications.

The 3D repository currently holds only a handful of files, despite opening nearly a year ago – the 3D printer has absorbed most of the team’s attention. That’s finally changing this month, thanks in part to a new research grant that will fund the work.

At the moment, the team is working on scanning about 30 objects – mostly shells and bones – from the marine biology collection of the university’s Thomas McCulloch Museum. Items from the Dal libraries’ physical archives, including props from old Neptune Theatre plays, will be next. After that, Groenendyk says they’ll tackle “any other projects that come up.”

“It’s about opening up that whole history to a wider audience, making it more accessible,” says Groenendyk. “You won’t need to be within Halifax to come see this marine biology collection. You just need Internet access.”

The work is done on a $3,000 NextEngine laser scanner purchased for the project.

https://player.vimeo.com/video/59580696

Students are expected to be some of the main users of the repository. In the near future, Groenendyk envisions library patrons checking out 3D anatomy models to go with their medical textbooks, or analyzing the dents and brushstrokes on a piece of pottery at extreme magnification to aid their anthropology studies. Should anyone want to take the objects from the digital realm back into the physical world, every item in the database will be 3D-printable.

The Nova Scotia Museum recognized the educational uses of digital scans when Groenendyk offered to scan portions of their collections last summer. The files he built will be featured on an upcoming website for the museum and may eventually be incorporated into static displays next to the physical originals.

“The average person is going to be able to see these objects in ways that they could never see them before, and often in ways that we can’t even show the real object,” says David Christianson, manager of the museum’s collections unit.

The files even hold enough detail for scientific and historical research. Christianson says his museum is now exploring the possibility of sharing digital scans with researchers around the world to avoid the risk of transporting the fragile originals.

When Groenendyk scanned a fragment of the SS Mont-Blanc, the ship at the centre of the Halifax Explosion, for the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, marine history curator Dan Conlin saw the technology’s potential.

Seashell in the process of scanning

“It wasn’t until I saw the 3D image that I got a real sense of the distortion and the direction of forces that ripped apart those steel fragments,” says Conlin. “I’d never noticed that just holding it in my hands.”

Several major museums, including the Smithsonian Institution, have recently begun 3D digitization of their collections, but Christianson says the concept is “brand new” to Nova Scotia’s museums. Libraries have explored the idea even less.

For Groenendyk, the repository is a logical extension to the role of a library. What ebooks have done for texts, 3D models will do for physical objects. In a digital form, they will be archived, shared and preserved.

“You don’t know, a thousand years from now, how many of these objects will still be around,” he says. “These digital files might stand the test of time.”

SMU football team members’ posts mock consent

Even as the university faced intense scrutiny following a frosh week rape chant, members of SMU’s varsity football team made posts that trivialized sexual violence.

SMU Huskies Football team playing against Mount Allison. (Photo: Kate Ross)

In the months following national attention over a frosh week rape chant at Saint Mary’s University, players on the university’s football team have been posting public tweets endorsing violence against women, condoning bullying and condemning homosexuality.

The university launched a highly publicized president’s council report to investigate attitudes specifically toward sexual violence on campus, however members of the football team have been making posts that denigrate and trivialize the issue of sexual consent.

Rhys Tansley, who is still registered on the roster but stopped playing for the team in the fall, published a misogynistic tweet in October.

tweet3

He wished mortal violence on one woman later that month.

On Jan. 12, receiver Tyler Ganhao retweeted a message by Bad Advice Dog reading “See a girl who’s feeling down? Feel her up.”

He favourited a message by Bad Advice Dog reading “No means yes and yes means anal”. Favourites are viewable by anyone with a Twitter account.

Perry Marchese, coach of the Saint Mary’s University varsity football team, had not been following his team on Twitter when UNews presented him with examples of tweets written by some of his players.

“Some of them are upsetting for sure,” Marchese said after being shown five of the players’ tweets.

“It’s very disappointing to see it. Very disappointing, absolutely.”

He has watched their Facebook profiles but to his knowledge, no one at SMU has the job of monitoring the social media presence of student athletes. Most SMU football players are active in social media, with more than a dozen active on Twitter.

Marchese says that earlier in the year, someone pointed out to him his players were tweeting about a party they were specifically told to not mention on social media. Marchese says he had the team run as punishment.

Since then, he hasn’t followed their tweets, but has told them repeatedly to watch the image they portray as Huskies.

The players retweet each other, post pictures from their lives and are followed by accounts associated with SMU. 

On Oct. 9 Troy Adams, linebacker, tweeted at someone calling them a fag.

Team members’ posts also belittle gays and members of Asian cultures.

On Nov. 10, linebacker Keith Langille retweeted a message by @BroCulture: “School is like a boner. It’s long and hard unless you’re Asian.”

Some of the tweets that could be taken as offensive are quotes from popular media, such as song lyrics.

Song lyrics from rapper Immortal Technique’s “Black Vikings”.

The song lyrics, a couple times, have gotten me,” says Marchese. “I’ve seen some stuff put up on Facebook and I’ll message them […] and they’ll say it’s just a quote from a song.”

He says he asks them all the time to remove posts he’s seen as offensive from Facebook, and that they are constantly educated on monitoring their own social media.

“We preach it all the time, we talk about it all the time and to actually see some evidence that they aren’t getting it is a good education for me.”

Perry Marchese, head coach of the Saint Mary's University Huskies football team.

The team’s online roster on the SMU website is outdated, including at least two players no longer playing for the team, Rhys Tansley and Jordan Lauther.

But Marchese says he wants his players to have the mentality they’ll always be members of the team.

“They’re always gonna be perceived as good and bad as a Saint Mary’s Football player, no matter what they do – and for the rest of their life, really,” says Marchese. “There’ll be guys on there who aren’t on the team anymore and if something happened with one of them somewhere down the road, it’ll still be mentioned: SMU football player.”

President’s Council Report

The university commissioned a review of campus attitudes toward sexual consent in response to the rape chants at a frosh week event at SMU in September. The President’s Council, led by Dalhousie law professor Wayne MacKay, released its report in December. The report contains 20 suggestions for changing the campus’ culture.

MacKay was unavailable for comment.

The football team was at a training camp off-campus at the time of the rape chants, but the report contains many recommendations specifically regarding the behaviour of student athletes.

In relation to preventing sexualized violence and fostering a safe and respectful learning environment, the report suggests it is important for SMU to consider “the important role that student athletes can play in shaping peer norms.” It goes on to say varsity athletics have a high profile on campus, and “coaches can play a leadership role in changing varsity sport from a culture that is accepting of sexualized violence to one that speaks out against sexualized violence.”

Sexualized violence is not a subject that comes up in Marchese’s talks with his team.

“I guess you sort of imply it all the time when you talk about being a good community member, being a good student athlete, being an ambassador of Saint Mary’s,” says Marchese. “We did the Walk A Mile In Her Shoes for Violence Against Women. So, that’s one way we educate our guys for sure.”

The report mentions some SMU students reported “feeling a ‘macho vibe’ from the jock culture at SMU and feeling uncomfortable in places like the cafeteria where male athletes were engaged in chauvinistic behaviour involving sexist jokes.” Players have used derogatory terms towards women, such as Joel Chapman, offensive lineman, on Dec. 31.

Staci Simpson, co-coordinator of the SMU Women’s Centre and a graduate student, sat on the President’s Council.

“I’m disgusted,” said Simpson upon seeing some of the tweets. “I’m disappointed that this kind of attitude is still there. I’m still not surprised, it’s still so deeply embedded in jock culture that I know it’s one of the things we need to change.”

Marchese has had a copy of the President’s Council Report on his desk since it was available, but he has only “flipped through it,” not gone through it in detail. He says it is sometimes brought up in coach’s meetings.

But Marchese says he doesn’t know if he is educated enough to specifically talk to his team about issues of sexualized violence.

He says the athletics department has done work on anti-bullying in the past and it will be jumping back into this. Some of the player’s tweets imply violence.

Marchese says the athletics department has lectures where it’s mandatory for all student athletes to be in attendance, but he can’t say if sexualized violence is specifically covered there.

What happens now?

University president Colin Dodds has approved every recommendation of the report. It says the school should establish a code of conduct that will cover “standards for the use of media and Internet by all members of the university community.”

At the same time, SMU communications director Steve Proctor says it would be unrealistic for the university to monitor every tweet made by SMU students.

Proctor was read some of the tweets on Friday and maintained that the university is not responsible for the personal Twitter accounts of student athletes.

Gorba Bhandari, president of the Student Union of Saint Mary’s University, agrees it’s “hard to monitor everything.”

“Hopefully once the recommendations are starting to be in place we would see more awareness talked of in athletics, or in these athletes,” says Bhandari, who sat on the President’s Council, “and hopefully nothing like this would happen.”

Upon seeing some of the tweets, Marchese said he would talk to his team through Facebook.

“I’ll say […] I’ve seen a couple of the posts, a few of the posts, and there’s a lot of offensive stuff going on there. You’re jeopardizing your chance to stay a Saint Mary’s Husky if you keep doing it.”

Since then, some members of the team have made their accounts private and deleted tweets. Members of the team did not respond to requests for comment on this story.

In researching this story UNews examined a variety of tweets from student athletes at Dalhousie, Acadia and SMU. No similar patterns were found.

Excerpts from the Twitter feeds of players of the Saint Mary’s Huskies Football team

maritime bus

New regional bus service for students

Acadian Coach Lines is shutting down the regional bus service Nov. 30, but not all students are aware a new service is taking over.

“I’m really worried about finding a ride home,” says Harrison Makohoniuk, a student at Dalhousie University. “It’s my main way to get back to Moncton. Without the bus, you’re stuck in Halifax or at the mercy of others.”

Students have options such as the shuttle service, or carpooling.

Makohoniuk was relieved to learn Maritime Buses and its affiliated companies Trius Tours Ltd, Prince Edward Tours Inc. and WTS Bus Charters Inc. have received approval from the Nova Scotia Utility and Review Board as well as the New Brunswick Energy and Utilities Board to provide bus service to P.E.I., New Brunswick and Nova Scotia starting Dec. 1.

Mike Cassidy, chief operating officer of Maritime Buses, expects a smooth transition in bus service for Acadian Lines customers.

But fewer riders and higher costs have made it impossible for Acadian Bus Lines to cover costs, says Denis Gallant of Acadian Lines’ parent company, Groupe Orléans Express. Maritime operations have lost $12-million since 2004.

Acadian Coach Lines applied to the Nova Scotia Utilities and Review Board asking permission to drop community bus service requirements in unprofitable areas in 2004, but the review board denied the company’s request.  Instead, Acadian Lines was granted fare increases but weren’t able to restore profitability to their regional bus service.

Cassidy says he can operate affordable regional bus service as well as make a profit. He is a chartered accountant by profession, and an assistant professor of financial accounting and entrepreneurship at the University of Prince Edward Island. He is experienced in motor carrier operations and has started three different commercial motor coach companies. Maritime Bus is part of the Coach Atlantic Group of Companies incorporated in 2005.

According to documents filed before the Nova Scotia Public Utilities Review Board, Coach Atlantic Group generated $11-million in gross revenues last year has $14-million in capital investment, 175 employees, a fleet of 42 motor coaches, 22 transit vehicles and 28 other vehicles.  The company operates maintenance facilities in Dieppe, Saint John, Charlottetown and Halifax.

New services

Maritime Buses plans to run a maximum of five buses a day between Moncton and Halifax beginning Dec. 1 as part of a regional bus service. A one-way fare to Moncton is estimated $48.00 — a ten cent increase over Acadian Coach Lines’ existing fare. Buses departing Halifax for Moncton are tentatively scheduled at 8:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m, 1:00 p.m, 4:00 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.

Cassidy’s message to students relying on the bus service between these two cities is,”Don’t worry! Study for your exams – we’re gonna get you home and back to university.”

He is offering students a 15 per cent discount on fares, online ticketing, a customer loyalty program and free Wi-Fi on coaches in 2013.

Maritime Buses is in the process of negotiating stops on or near university-serviced routes as well as making stops at airports and train stations. The company plans to have its fares and route schedules posted on its website by Nov. 26. Students relying on bus service for return travel to university after the winter break still have the option to travel by bus.

Ladies first? SMU prof wants classroom rule

Women should be heard first in the classroom, a forum on misogyny at Dalhousie University heard Thursday.

“Men should not be allowed to monopolize these forums,” Saint Mary’s University management professor Judy Haiven said.

Seven panelists spoke to the crowd in the Dalhousie Student Union Building’s largest conference room on Thursday to discuss misogyny on university campuses.

Haiven suggested several ideas to combat misogyny, all of them centred on promoting female participation in events.

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Her idea that women should always speak first in classroom discussions and at public events was brought up several times during the forum.

Haiven said she already tries to apply this idea in her own classroom.

“(In) the management department, women get to speak first. I think that that is a primary issue that we actually have to look at, how to do question and answer (periods). And we can start today.”

The misogyny forum was held on the same day that Halifax Regional Police said it would not pursue a criminal investigation in the Dalhousie dentistry scandal, after reviewing controversial Facebook posts.

Haiven’s idea was met by a round of applause, but not everyone agreed with her suggestion.

The panel fielded a question from Twitter asking whether the idea would just “perpetuate the problem the other way?”

“Yes, I suppose at some point that could happen,” Haiven said.

“But right now what we see is … women generally don’t come forward and speak up at meetings … we see women taking a backseat.

“We see that there has to be some kind of affirmative action so that women, I hope, take a more active role in the classroom, in running things, in various student affairs. We’ve got a real problem.”More women are graduating with university degrees than ever before, and often take up the majority of classes, “yet you wouldn’t know that.”

Three panelists at Dal’s forum on misogyny watch a rap video at the beginning of the discussion. Photo: Keili Bartlett

Jacqueline Skiptunis, vice-president academic and external for the Dalhousie Student Union, said she personally has been hesitant to talk in group discussions. When she did speak up, her statements were often questioned, and believed only when a man agreed with her.

Jude Ashburn agreed with Haiven.

“I think that women of colour should speak first in class,” Ashburn said after the panel discussion.

Ashburn is an outreach co-ordinator for South House, a gender and sexual resource centre in Halifax, and identifies as a “non-binary trans person.”

“When I do activist circles or workshops, I often say, ‘OK, if you’re white and you look like me and you raise your hand, I’m not going to pick on you before someone of colour.’ So I do give little disclaimers, like people of colour will have priority, or if you’re a person with a disability, you’re pushed to the front … I mean, you know, bros fall back,” Ashburn said with a laugh.

Ashburn said during the panel that they feel “burned out” when “what about the men?” is asked in “every conversation” about misogyny.

Ashburn said people can get upset with this approach, because they have to give up some privilege, a topic the forum discussed throughout the first panel of speakers.

Jacqueline Warwick said it’s not the first time she’s heard such a rule suggested.

Warwick is the former co-ordinator of the gender and women’s studies department at Dalhousie and one of the four Dal professors who filed a complaint against Dal’s restorative justice approach.

“That’ll be a difficult one for people to accept,” Warwick said.

“I do think, in general, there are a lot of studies that indicate women, girls are socialized not to speak first. … And so to make a conscious rule, a deliberate rule that is explicit, that ‘no, men are not allowed to speak first,’ is certainly a strong way of addressing that issue, but one that will at least get people thinking about it,” said Warwick.

“That’s already some progress, I believe.”

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